Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird Facts and Information

Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird

The Pineapple green cheek conure is a beautiful parrot that comes from South America. It can grow to be about 14 inches long and has a lifespan of 20-30 years. Pineapple green cheek conures are highly social birds that like to cuddle in their cages with other Pineapple green cheeks. They enjoy playing outside of the cage but should never be let out without supervision due to the risk of injury or death by predators such as cats, dogs, and hawks.

The pineapple green cheek conure bird is a social parrot that can live up to 30 years in captivity while growing about 14 inches long. They originate from South America and enjoy the company of other pineapples in their cages and playing outside of it when supervised by an adult human. They should never be let out without supervision due to predators such as cats, dogs, and hawks who may injure or even kill them.

Pineapples are the variation of green cheek conures with a yellow-colored head, bright red chest feathers, and tail feathers that vary in color from light red to maroon. They have an orange beak with ruby-red eyes.

how long do green cheek conures live?

Green cheek conures can live up to 30 years in captivity, but this may vary based on how they are treated.

Sadly, many new parrot owners do not understand the level of care their pet needs. This can cause a shortened lifespan for some parrots.

Pineapples are not an exception to this. Pineapples require a balanced diet of fruits, vegetables, seeds, and pellets but if the owner does not provide enough green crops like broccoli or spinach they may be more prone to illness in captivity with only fruit as dietary intake.

How much does a pineapple green cheek conure cost?

Purchasing a parrot can be challenging, as there are many factors to take into consideration. If you’ve already owned birds before, then you might want to purchase an older bird that has been trained and socialized. They are often more expensive because of their age and training status.

The Pineapple green cheek conure can cost anywhere from $150 to $800 depending on the breeder and where you purchase them.

Other factors contribute to the price including lineage, gender of the Pineapple green cheek conure, and any additional features such as color mutations.

If you are looking for a Pineapple green cheek conure in an animal shelter or privately owned pet store then they will likely cost about \$150-\$400 depending on if it is male or female with more expensive variations ranging from \$800 to over gender, age, and lineage.

Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird
Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird sitting on the leg of his owner

How big do green cheek conures get?

Green cheek conures can grow up to 14 inches long and live for about 20-30 years, depending on how well they are cared for.

The average adult also weighs 60 to 80 grams with smaller varieties measuring around 8 inches in length.

Do pineapple green cheeked conures make good pets?

Pineapple green cheek conures make excellent pets. They are social and love to cuddle with other Pineapples in their cages or on your shoulder while you pet them.

The green cheek conure is a popular pet bird due to its loyalty and intelligence. They are very docile, easy-going birds that enjoy the company of humans. If you want an intelligent companion who loves being around people then this may be your perfect match!

The popularity of Green Cheek Conures as household pets has skyrocketed in recent years for their lovable temperament and devotion to mankind’s companionship; they’re also rather clever little creatures which makes them all the more endearing amongst animal lovers worldwide.

Where does the pineapple green cheek conure bird live?

Pineapple green cheek conures originate from South America.

However, Pineapples are very adaptable and can live in any climate as long as they receive enough heat or light during the colder months and have plenty of space to fly around in their cage at home.

They also enjoy living outdoors when you bring them out under supervision for an hour a day (at least). Pineapples love climbing trees just like their wild cousins do!

Pineapple green cheek conures are not suited for living in places with long winters or cold climates, as they do require a significant amount of heat to be comfortable.

Pineapples also tend to develop behavioral problems if they are not kept busy with toys and other objects. Pineapple green cheeked parrots thrive when allowed to explore their environment so be sure to provide plenty of toys and space for them to fly around. Pineapples are also social birds that enjoy the company of other Pineapple green cheeked conures so be sure to have at least two Pineapples in one cage, or they may become very sad from being alone all day long!

Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird
Couple of Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Birds

What do green cheeked conure eat?

Pineapple green cheek conures eat a lot of fresh veggies and fruit. Pineapples are actually not the best choice, as they don’t have enough nutrients that Pineapples need and may be more prone to illness in captivity with only fruit as dietary intake. Pineapples also enjoy lots of nuts such as peanuts or almonds which can help them grow strong bones!

Pineapples also love to eat the seed. Pineapple green cheek conures are omnivores and will enjoy a good variety of foods, so be sure that fresh fruit and veggies make up the majority of their diet!

Pineapples are also very sensitive to high levels of salt and sugar. Pineapple green cheek conures love fresh fruit such as apples, plums, oranges, berries, grapes, or melons!

Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird playing with his owner
Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird playing with his owner

Green cheeked conure also enjoys fresh vegetables such as zucchini, green beans, corn, carrots, and peas! Pineapple green cheek conures should not consume more than one tablespoon of salt per day. Pineapples love to drink water too but try to be sure that they don’t have access to any standing water at all times because Pineapples can drown in it very easily; keep a bowl of fresh drinking water for your pet bird instead.

Pineapple green cheeked conure birds are omnivores which means they eat both meat (like nuts) and plants (fruits & veggies). A pineapple’s diet needs to include lots of fruit every day since the body lacks the enzymes needed for breaking down protein into usable amino acids if their diet is only fruit.

Pineapples should also eat vegetables like green beans, zucchini, corn, and peas to get the different nutrients they need from both types of food! Pineapple green cheek conures will enjoy an occasional egg or worm (which is a natural protein source for birds) as treats but these should not be given more than once per week.

Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Personality

Pineapple green cheek conures are social birds that love to play and interact with humans. Pineapples will often talk back and mimic human speech which makes them a rather intelligent pet bird for many people! Pineapples are also very loyal, loving animals so they may not be the best choice for someone who is gone all day at work or doesn’t have enough time to spend with their new pet bird.

However, Pineapples do require at least an hour of supervised outdoor activity per day to get some much needed fresh air and exercise; it’s easy enough to set up a safe playground area in your backyard where you can bring your pineapple outside whenever desired (just make sure there aren’t any hazards like wild dogs). Pine

Keep your parrot entertained with swings, festive playtime perches that allow them to go in and out of things, lay on their backs, or hang upside down. Neglected birds become problem ones so you need to spend time interacting with them every day!

Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird
Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird playing with his owner

Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Health Problems

Pineapple green cheek conures are usually very healthy animals but Pineapples may become sick if not given adequate care. Pineapples can suffer from a condition called plucking which is when a Pineapple will pull out their own feathers and then chew at them until they’re all gone, or the pineapple will start to bite themselves constantly for no reason at all!

Pluckies (as this condition is often referred to) could be caused by stress, boredom, anxiety, lack of vitamin D in captivity without enough sunlight exposure on skin areas like feet & lower legs that don’t have feathers blocking light…or many other unknown reasons. The best way to treat plucking is with lots of love and attention so make sure you spend time playing with your Pineapple green cheek conure bird daily.

Pineapples are also prone to a condition called metabolic bone disease which is when Vitamin D deficient birds start showing signs of weaker bones and pain in their legs, feet, toes & tail so be sure to feed your Pineapple a healthy diet that includes lots of fruit (which provides the Pineapple with the vitamins and minerals they need to stay healthy).

Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird eating his food
Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird eating his food

Pineapples are also prone to getting an eye infection if not properly cared for. Eye infections can be caused by a Pineapple biting its own feathers on the back of its head (which ends up in dirty water that drips onto one or both eyes) so make sure your Pineapple’s cage is always clean and that the Pineapple doesn’t have any feathers on top of its head or in front of their eyes.

If you notice a watery discharge from one eye, redness around an eye, crusting near a nostril (which can be mistaken for a respiratory problem), lethargic behavior, or irritability…you may want to take your Pineapple in for a vet visit so they can get their eyes checked out and prescribe any necessary medications.

Chlamydiosis

Chlamydiosis is an infection caused by the bacteria “Chlamydia psittaci” which lives in feces, feather dust & droppings from the Pineapple’s parents and may be inhaled or ingested by their chicks during incubation (or from unsanitary conditions). Pineapples can get chlamydiosis by coming into contact with infected feces, feather dust & droppings from the Pineapple’s parents, and maybe inhaled or ingested by their chicks during incubation (or from unsanitary conditions)

Symptoms of Chlamydiosis include an increased appetite, weight loss, diarrhea, and respiratory problems.

Toxicity

Pineapples are also prone to developing a condition called environmental toxicity which is when your Pineapple has been exposed to toxins in its environment that could be anything from pesticides, insecticides, fertilizers…anything you use on your lawn or garden may end up affecting your Pineapple so make sure there aren’t any dangerous substances where they live. This is especially concerning for those of us who have outdoor parrots like pines because it doesn’t take long before these chemicals will be absorbed by the Pineapple’s skin or lungs.

Polyomavirus

Pineapples are also prone to getting a Polyomavirus which is when Pineapples get hepatitis, will start losing appetite and interest in their favorite foods. Pineapples may become lethargic, stop eating & drinking or experience weight loss.

Polyomavirus is a deadly infection that affects the organs and body parts. Young parrots are most at risk, usually dying from it due to their weakened immunity as well as other viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites. The virus can also lower the bird’s resistance without symptoms being shown in some cases which makes them vulnerable to further infections until they do show signs of illness later on when it’s too late for treatment.

Polyomavirus is often fatal with young birds being affected more than older ones where many die before showing any sign of illness because their loss of defenses allows an invasion by various pathogens including those that cause severe respiratory problems like pneumonia.

Aspergillosis

Aspergillosis is an infection caused by the fungus “Aspergillus” which grows in Pineapples’ lungs when their immune system becomes weak and leaves them susceptible to respiratory problems. Pineapples can get aspergillosis from coming into contact with Aspergillus, or through inhalation of dusty air (which can cause Pineapples to develop an allergic response).

The symptoms of aspergillosis are Pineapple sneezing, coughing or wheezing, and difficulty breathing.

Prevention: Pineapples will need their cages scrubbed down with soap every few days so that the Pineapple doesn’t ingest any bacteria or fungi which could cause respiratory problems or other illnesses. Pineapples will also need a new water dish and food bowl every few days so that the Pineapple doesn’t ingest any bacteria or fungi which could cause health issues.

When is it time to get your Pineapple checked out by a vet?

If you notice a clear discharge from the Pineapple’s eyes or nose, it could be time to get your Pineapple checked out by a vet.

If the Pineapple has been experiencing respiratory problems like sneezing and wheezing, coughing, difficulty breathing…it may be time for them to see a vet!

Pineapples with respiratory problems will need a Pineapple cage that’s big enough to allow them the space they need, as well as room for their wings and tail. Pineapples on medications may not be able to fly or climb!

Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird
Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird playing with his toy

Are Pineapple Green Cheek Conures Loud?

Pineapple Green Cheeks are considered to be one of the quieter conure species, and they make a variety of sounds. Pineapples will use their voice for communication as well as for self-communing. For example, Pineapples may chatter when meeting other Pineapples or humans that they know; however, those unfamiliar Pineapples may make a “hissing” sound. Pineapples can also produce an alarm call when they are in danger and will shriek to let their flock mates know that they’re being attacked by a predator such as a cat, dog, or human. Pineapple Green Cheeks have been known to scream if startled from sleep or if their cage is left open.

Pineapples can also scream when they are being handled or carried around by a person, which is more common in Pineapples that have been taken away from the flock during early age and raised as an individual. Pineapple Green Cheeks will make kiss noises to show affection for their human companions; however, these Pineapples can also screech when they are angry or scared. Pineapples that have not had a lot of social interaction with humans will scream more often because it is the only way to get attention and show displeasure for something.

Pineapple Green Cheeks vocalize in different ways depending on the situation; however, Pineapples are usually quieter than other conures. Pineapples may make a variety of different sounds, but they are typically not as loud or noisy except for certain situations.

Which more talkative pineapple conure or green cheek?

Pineapple Green Cheeks and Pineapples are both considered to be relatively more talkative than other conure species; however, there is not a lot of research on the subject. Pineapples will use their voice for communication as well as for self-communing. For example, Pineapples may chatter when meeting other Pineapples or humans that they know; however, those Pineapples unfamiliar to Pineapple Green Cheeks may make a “hissing” sound. Pineapples can also produce an alarm call when they are in danger and will shriek to let their flock mates know that they’re being attacked by a predator such as a cat, dog, or human.

Can green cheeked conures talk?

Pineapple Green Cheeks can learn to mimic human speech, and Pineapples may be able to do so as well. Pineapples don’t have the ability to produce sounds that humans are capable of making; therefore, they cannot speak in a way that we would understand. Pineapples will use their voice for communication as well as for self-communing. Pineapples can also produce an alarm call when they are in danger and will shriek to let their flock mates know that they’re being attacked by a predator such as a cat, dog, or human.

Pineapples can also scream when they are being handled or carried around by a person, which is more common in Pineapples that have been taken away from the flock during early age and raised as an individual. Pineapple Green Cheeks will make kiss noises to show affection for their human companions; however, these Pineapples can also screech when they are angry or scared. Pineapples that have not had a lot of social interaction with humans will scream more often because it is the only way to get attention and show displeasure for something.

Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird
Pineapple Green Cheek Conure Bird inside his cage

Behavioral problems of Pineapple green cheek conure

Pineapple Green Cheeks are known to be more active and playful than Pineapples; however, behavior problems may occur because of improper socialization with humans. Pineapple green cheek conure that has not had a lot of social interaction with humans will scream more often because it is the only way to get attention and show displeasure for something.

Aggression

Pineapple conures are naturally playful creatures, but they can become aggressive and destructive if left alone for too long. Signs that the bird is beginning to get angry include: 

-Ruffled feathers

-A crouched position or low hanging head

-Swinging from side to side of their cage as a sign of aggression 

Pineapple Conure’s eyes will also change in size rapidly when it becomes agitated – either growing bigger or smaller depending on what mood the animal might be feeling at any given time.

Biting

Like most other conures, pineapple green cheeked conures have a nasty habit of biting. This is more common in young and unsocialized pineapple-conure individuals that are suffering from trauma stemming from being rehomed or ill-tempered after being spoiled.

Cage requirements for Pineapple conure

The Pineapple’s cage should be large enough for them to fly around in, as they will do best when they get a decent amount of exercise. Pineapple green cheek conures like to be in high places to escape the ground and will eagerly climb up the bars on their cage, so there must be enough perches inside of the enclosure for them to land. The Pineapple’s cage should not have any vertical wires or horizontal wires that are too close together because Pineapples love to get up high and may injure themselves if they can’t crawl through these tight spaces.

Pineapple green cheek conures should have a variety of toys in their enclosure, including plastic wood or manzanita branches for them to chew on as well as swings, bells, mirrors, and ladders for them to play with.

When adopting a Pineapple Conure, it is important to find the best size cage for your bird. A 22-24 inch square space with 30 inches of height would provide adequate room for these playful creatures and be comfortable as well. Always make sure that there are ½ – ¾ inches in between metal bars; this way they can safely fly within their new home!

Pineapple green cheek conures are one of the most popular species to own as a pet. Pineapples can be very playful, but they also have their moments where they become aggressive and destructive if left alone for too long. Pineapple green cheek conure birds must have proper cage requirements so that they do not injure themselves or engage in behavioral problems. Pineapples love to chew on different types of toys and climb up high perches to get away from ground level; this is why they need to have adequate room inside these cages with ½-¾ inches between metal bars. The size of the Pineapple’s cage should be 22-24 inch square space with 30 inches in height – make sure there is enough room for your bird!

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Mohamed Rida Allah

This is Mohamed Rida Allah, A web designer and digital marketing specialist. The CEO of Noordev Technologies inc. Mohamed is a small business owner who's taken a more traditional approach to the professional bio on his website — but in a way that takes care to speak to his intended audience.

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